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Nelson Mandela 61, U.s. 21, China 16, North Korea 14, Thailand 13, Us 12, Bangui 10, South Africa 9, Morgan Radford 9, John Henry Smith 8, Cuba 8, Ukraine 7, Al Jazeera America 7, France 7, Michigan 6, Colorado 6, Obama 6, Soweto 6, Washington 5, Los Angeles 5,
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  Al Jazeera America    News    News/Business. Breaking and in-depth news coverage from  
   America and around the world and the latest in sports and...  

    December 8, 2013
    6:00 - 9:00am EST  

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if you can hold off it will probably be a better bet if you can do that. here is a look at the timing. lots of cold air in place. on 4 o'clock that's when we'll see the snow in new york city. it looks like we may not see much, but we are finally seeing the snow come down past new york, and then we'll get a mix of the warmer air surge from the south and the wintry weather will change to rain, so the monday morning commute will be a
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bit nasty. >> breaking news out of iraq where 16 are dead after a series of bombings across baghdad. it occurred in are predominantly shiite muslim district. violence in iraq has reached levels not seen in years. >> south korea raised the stakes expand its air defense zone. it follows a move by china. the south ean and chinese areas overlap. japan says they'll talk with their neighbours about access. >> it's a direct response to china's extension of its air zone. that extension overlaps seen's air defense zone and pertinently
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japan's one. china and japan over the island. that's an area includeing a reef. there is a south korean scientific research station built on that, it has a helipad on it and is under de facto south korean control. because of an accident in history when the americans drew the air defense zone, it didn't include that area or two other south korean islands which are not under dispute. this is an opportunity for south korea to right what many are surprised to see was the current situation and extend its own zone further south, allowing an ease of the military operation. the seen government making it clear that it is doing things in
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a different way to beijing, saying it consulting with its neighbours and with the u.s. >> the french president issued a veiled warning to the pvt central african republic. francis hollande said it will be tough to keep things in place. france is dispatching more than 1,000 troops. the fooun african union will double its forces there. everyone has been ordered off the streets except for peacekeepers and guards. >> jacky rowland has more on the summit in paris. we start with a warning - you may find some of the images in this report disturbing. >> french soldiers on foot patrol in bangui. it's new to the city and
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welcomed by many. they are here to reassure people to open up shops. also little the french can do about the growing sectarian violence between meeuws himself and christ nans. >> we muslims have been here for 250 years. anti-balaka millish areas killed more than 250 people. they slaughtered us. >> this is where many quistians are sheltering. this is the protection of french and african forces. there'll be another 2,500 african soldiers here soon. they'll head to different parts of the country, where hundreds of thousands have lost their homes. too late for the people in this hospital. they were evacuated after attack from fighters in the mainly
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muslim seleka troops. the hospital treated hundreds of people. what happened here was horrific. seleka went inside, dragging out injured people, killing at least 10. n months ago the rebel group seleka marched in bangui, bringing with it thousands of foreign fighters. the man that led the rebellion is holed up in this military base and will not accept that power is slipping away. >> how can you call yourself head of state of a country that you have absolutely no control over? >> translation: it's too much to say i have no control. i control my men, the men i can't control are not my men. there is school settling after 10 years of francois bozize, all
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the crimes he committed that he has not yet answered for. >> anti-balaka includes members of the army of former president francois bozize. al jazeera learnt that they are now outside bangui, waiting for reinforcements. people here are waiting for the next big battle. this time around the french and african forces have a chance of preventing more bloodshed. >> it's been promised to provide support. >> at the end of the 2-day summit the french took the opportunity of having so many african leaders under one roof to stay on and talk about the french and african republics. it was a decision to address the
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african forces to 6,000. there were plans to disarm rebels to get the militias back into the barracks and bases. in the longer term, there were plans to work in the religious tensions, at a donor's conference. part of the reinforcements are an enlargement from the french contingent. president francis holland said there are 1600 french troops in the south african republic. the french are engaged in mallee, 1600 in the central african republic. france wants to turn over african policing to african peace-keeping forces. france is engaged in two countries for some time to come. >> south africa beginnings a week of ser -- ceremonies
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honouring nelson mandela. crowds left flowers, photographs and balloons outside nelson mandela's home in johannesburg. a memorial service will be held on tuesday with president obama, george w. bush, and jimmy carter. the man defending nelson mandela's yisent is also speaking out. mike hanna sat with him to talk about the unique relationship. >> there was an excessive part of the government that get-nelson mandela in gaol, and he served under nelson mandela in the first democratic cabinet. as u.n. ambassador and foreign minister, it was his task to publicly defend the yisent of nelson mandela and other political opponents. privately he maintains he lobbied for nelson mandela's
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release. >> in 1982 i submitted a memorandum prepared by my department. and to the effect that nelson mandela ought to be released. we were making a bigger martyr of you every day stays in prison. that is international. and status. would be growing to an extent where he would not be able to handle it. eight years later nelson mandela became a free man. here you had a man who spent 27 years in prison and the day he was released. he displayed the - he displayed the cuban and energy to the person. who has been a president before.
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amazing what this idea, in the minds of people and for that matter, into world affairs. >> and central to the success of the process, that led to a peaceful transfer of power, was nelson mandela's insistence that there need be no losers, that all could win. >> we were not capitulating. you do not capitulate and surrender when you do the right thing. you liberrate yourself. that's what we do. it was not a cap ittual ace. >> and a man who says he was liberated quotes from a statement at his trial all those years ago. >> i have challenged the idea of
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a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony with people. he concluded by saying it is an ideal which i hope to live for and achieve. but if needs be, it is an ideal for which i am prepared to die. having fought white domination, having fought black domination. it was that balance that enabled him to see that it is in the interests of this country that the blacks lead the whites and the whites lead the blacks. that is nelson mandela. that is his legacy.
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>> the minister of energy and mineral affairs for the first government. >> a team of inspectors is expected to arrive in iran to tour military facilities. it's the first time a team is able to visit the site. a long-standing deal to monitor the weapons is as likely to fail as it is to succeed. iran agreed to role back the enrichment of uranium used to build a nuclear bomb or generate nuclear energy. we have to not constantly assume that it's not possible far iran, like any country to change over time. it may not be likely. likelihood that we are able to
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arrive at the end state that i was describing earlier, i wouldn't say that it's more than 50/50. but we have to try. >> iran, the u.s. and five other world powers will meet in the coming days to discuss a 6 month agreement on the nuclear program. >> meanwhile, back in the u.s. a korean veteran returns home. reunited with his family he speaks out. >> and a message for president obama - about love for his country. >> protesters in ukraine gear up for a demonstration - the ultimatum given to the president to end the conflict.
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>> good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford, live in new york city. after weeks being held in north korea a u.s. veteran is home in america, reunite with his family.
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in a moment we'll hear from merrill newman about his tourist trip that ended in detention. >> it will be cold. temperatures across the nation will stay below average. right now it's minus 14. it feels like we are minus 45 degrees. we have bone-chilling conditions across the northern area of the country. going down to the northern plains, temperatures subzero. we are at 1 degree in minneapolis. not much of a warm up is expected. there's advisories particularly for the wind chills through the dakotas. with the cold air we are expecting to see snow before day's end. >> meanwhile, a veteran held by north korea for weeks has returned to his family in
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california. north korea detained 85-year-old merrill newman, while he was visiting places where he fought in the corey an war. >> when merrill newman made the trip to north korea, he would not know how difficult it would turn out. after weeks in detention, he's back in the u.s., looking healthy, wife by his side, with a simple message. >> good home coming. i'm tired, but i'm here with my family now. thank you all for the support we have got and very much appreciated. >> newman was a soldier in the korean war, and his visit to pyongyang was a long-planned vacation. he was no ordinary soldier. the north koreans released this confession admitting his affiliation to the white tigers, an elite group.
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for merrill newman, the war was ancient criticism, but north korea, ready to fight american imperialist, merrill newman was an enemy of the state. the two countries never signed a peace treaty, are technically at war and as such his release likely required the personal approval of kim jong un. why north korea decided to let north korea go now is a mystery. >> after merrill newman has some rest we'll have more to say about his unusual and difficult journey. for now though, we ask you to allow us time to be with him as a family and ask that you not forget another american, kenneth bae, still held in the dprk. >> kenneth bae, sentenced to prison. he was caught spreading the word of christianity. deemed a greater threat than his soldier. merrill newman missed
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thanksgiving. considering the unpredict ability it was not clear if merrill newman would be let go. but he returned in time for the holidays. >> a senior obama admission officials said merrill newman's release was a direct result of contact between washington and pyongyang. >> a cuban boy, elian gonzalez, caught and a tug of war between his family in the u.s. and cuba. now 20 years old he is speaking out saying he's happy about his cuban upbringing. >> translation: i have lived let there be no doubt. whoever let there be no doubt. whoever is interested in this, i am >> elian gonzalez made the comments whilst attending a student conference in ecuador, which is the first time he left
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the country since being handed back to his father. he doesn't forgive his american relatives for trying to keep him in the u.s. and calls for president obama to lift the embargo. >> protesters prepare to take to the streets on monday in thailand. in the past it may have let the military to seize power. veronica pedrosa has more on the choice based on the thai military. >> thailand's military on felt opportunity duty. that parade is part of celebrations for the kings birthday. the military and monarchy, two institutions, both centre stage and behind the scene. now people in bangkok are once again seeing scenes of violence like this. the question being asked: is
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thailand's military prepared to stage another kout deta, it would be the 12th. the headquarters are surrounded by protesters. the soldiers are staying in their barracks. it could be a transformative moment in thai politics. whatever decision the army takes about what to do next could be the crucial factor. what the military wants is a matter of debate. we spoke to a top security official. he told us some protesters are soldiers. did you say some protesters are soldiers? >> yes. [ inaudible ] >> back in 2010 during mass demonstrations there was talk about how the military was
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provoking violence and used it as an excuse to take power. >> thailand has changed. we cannot go back. the country is controlled by a small group of people. it's a turning point. >> the last time the military grabbed power in 2006 it was from thaksin shinawatra. it tried to return it to the people through a new constitution. the current prime minister yingluck shinawatra tried to amend it. some say the military wants to back by using what looks like a people's resolution. >> translation: the army can't put up with the situation. if it can't solve the political problem. >> how likely is it that there would be another coup? >> i cannot say. >> the next few months will tell in the military is ready to march to a new and different
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tune. >> the democratic party is protesting the ilget massy of the government. remembing nelson mandela. the people around the world celebrate the leader. i share my own story meeting him and his grandson. honouring those that lost their lives. thousands gathered to pay respects in the pearl harbour attack. >> i'm john henry smith, and an exciting game had a ripple affect in college football. highlights ahead in sport.
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>> welcome back, i'm morgan radford and these are the top stories. south korea announced an expansion of its air defense zone. the extension covering an area of the east china sea claimed by beijing and tokyo.
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china came under criticism for claiming part of the area. >> a cold snap has caused a few accidents. including this man in this vehicle that lost control and slid off a bridge. expected conditions and airport delays are expected from virginia to new england. >> a day of warning in south africa as the nation and the world pays tributable to nelson mandela. nelson mandela's ex-wife winnie attended a church service. president obama, george w. bush and clinton will travel to south africa for memorial services. >> we go to our correspondent at the soweto church where services wrapped up. what is significant about this
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church? these are some of the church members in the church listening to the service. this building was a lot of things to many people. up therefore on the painting on the wall is the painting of a great activist. we have nelson mandela, and archbishop desmond tutu. during apartheid students running from the police used to come in and hide. there were occasions that police would come in and shoot them, and several have died in this building. it's an emotional time, an historical place. it shows how far the country has come. >> you mentioned people cowering in the church. what are religious leaders saying today about madeba's passing. >> the message is simple.
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it was think about the good things and learn from him. one thing was be a good person. the police were saying for example, share a meal with a friend. sit, chat, talk about nelson mandela, talk about the moments that you loved about him, the moments that made you laugh and cry, and what you learnt from the great man. that is the message, go out there. not just today, but spend the rest of your life living a life that nelson mandela lived and be a good person. it's not difficult. yes, he was a great man, but any person can be a good person. >> you mentioned the moments of laughter. we saw images of people in the streets of soweto dancing. has the mood shifted from one of mourning to one of celebrating his legacy? >> yes, it is. it's a great thing to do. nelson mandela was 95 years old. when someone that old die, spend
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days crying. you gather with your family and friends and celebrate the life of a person, be it your grandfather or someone like nelson mandela that people saw as the father of the nation. there's now a chance to celebrate what a great man nelson mandela was. >> that's beautiful. the images are gripping. thank you so much for joining us from soweto. >> people from all over are sharing their stories about nelson mandela, remembering the man who changed a country and, in essence, the world. for some his legacy was personal. i had the privilege to interview his grandson about his legacy. >> in 2012 i interviewed nelson mandela's grandson who went to live with nelson mandela when he was 11. >> before he became president in "93 he came to fetch me.
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i stayed with him then. >> he told me about the first time he met his grandfather, when he was behind bars serving his sentence. >> i was eight or nine. my parents told me we were going to see my grandfather in gaol. >> when we got to the place, it had a proper house, tv, beautiful house and a pool. i was like, "wow, when i grow up one day, i want to go to gaol. i thought that's how people live in gaol." i thought i wanted to be like my grandfather and go to gaol when i grow up >>. a convict he was not. though he laughs now, he, like the country, was forever changed. >> the legacy of apartheid is still very much alive.
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just in a different way. apartheid was a brutal violence system. that is what we are fighting. presenting a positive image of our country of our continent and people. >> that image of africa is what his grandfather tried to redefine. >> when he came out of jam and said, "i don't want to take revenge, i want to create peace, move forward and bring development. >> if you look at his legacy, a person that had compassion for his people. moving forward, redefining what does africa represent. who are we, what is our history. >> that is what is seen as the task ahead of him. as a sav gan, a young person and nelson mandela.
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for me i'm continuing what has been started. >> continuing something for a man whose leg as si it seems is in good hands. >> he started a foundation called africa rising. focused on rebranding africa, showing global contribution. >> anti-government protesters take to the streets. demonstrators are hoping for a manch. thousands couped the square. demonstrations were started because of you crauh-uh crane's obviouslying an e.u. agreement. let's o go to kiev. good morning. opposition is calling for a march. do we expect to see that kind of support?
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>> i can tell you that a lot of people have shown up so far today here on independence square. it's called mydan. it is impressive to see the numbers of flags fluffing in the breeze, it's below zero. there's snow in the air. they need the large numbers. they are not going anywhere, they were going on for more than two weeks. their principle demand is that they want to have close integration with the european union. something that the president is steering this country away from when he said no in talks with the e.u. in viel nier a week or so ago. i'll step away from the camera so you can get a sense of what is going on, basically political
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leaders are talking. they are addressing the crowds. people are cheering. they say, "glory to you yan." they want to stay out here. there's a little concern that there may be potential for some violence later because there was some incidents, nasty incidents with the police this time last week when they came and cleared the square and other areas. the organizers have been calling for hard hats so they can protect themseves from the police. the riot police are not year yet and the government gave the protesters until tuesday to clear the military buildings. >> the incredible energy in the scare. is there a chance that the government will bow to public pressure and walk away from the
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deal? >> i think the president viktor yanukovych at. moment is sitting tight. he has not agreed to sit with talks with the movement. it lacks the clarity of message or the attraction with the president. in 2004 they were calling specifically for re-elections. this time they want him to go or the government to step down for a new government. they are talking about obstruction measures, they want a change in the political system. these are ideas that are difficult to force concessions on. these are sitting with vladimir putin on friday. people want to know what he was discussing. this has been an this is a choice between europe or a choice between some kind of
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soviet union 2.4, they russia has a corrupting influence on the country. we'll see how things progress throughout the day. >> thank you for joining us from kiev. a car bomb attack from a police station in columbia killed eight people. it happened in a town south-east of the booingo tea. fighters known as farc are suspected of being behind the attack. leaders and officials are engaged in talks, trying to end a 50 year war that is taking 200,000 lives. >> 72 years ago this weekend pearl harbour was attacked. it was known as the day of infamy. 400 japanese plants bombarded
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-- planes bombarded hawaii, pushing u.s. in world war ii. thousands gathered at pearl harbour, including 72 veterans and survivors of the attack. the family overlooked the memorial for the uss "arizona," which sank during the attack killing 1200. >> officials are discouraging people from submitting paper applications for health care, worried that they will not be processed in time. people need to enrol by december 23rd to get coverage for the new year in january. >> a potentially major breakthrough in a fight against breakthrough in a fight against cancer. for people with leukaemia. it's a gene they werely altering the blood cells. doctors say success rates in tests have so far been stunning. in a statement issued in
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september by the american board they could clean men. two months later the board reversed its decision, allowing gynecologists to check men. to help us understand what is at stake is a social endeemiologist at columbia university. first off, i think it's fair to say most people associate gynecologists with women. why are men seeing them at all. >> obstet ricts and ginocology is the field of medicine of women, in particular reproductive. >> anal cancer is on the rise. and many of the procedures that are used to look for cervical cancer in women, pap smears, are
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similar to what can be used to it's a shift to use those as in male. >> what exactly was the argument. why did the board threaten them to rescind their participation. he board of gingology d many are choosing to do procedures n women that are not reproductive related and are seeing men for this reason. the american board decided it was time to bring that in. and to redefine the field
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>> why did they change their mind? >> they almost couldn't ignore it. >> yes, and many doctors that semen went to the board and said, "we are leaving these people in the cold." they don't have other options for care. this is the best we have. other studies have been funded. procedures to screen for anal cancer in men and women, decreasing the incidents, and not having the best trained doctors. it's an important goal giving the incidents of anal cancer to understand who has it and to treat it.
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>> what does that mean for doctors? will they need additional training to treat men? >> not necessarily. the same treatment uses a special scope and basically vein eggar to look at the mooug cosso, the sells for changes in cancer. it's the same procedure used in females. most egyns are able to do this. as this moves forward, given the reversal of their choice do not allow it in patients. increasingly residency training will have some training. >> thank you so much for being with us. >> john henry smith is here with a look in sport. >> thank you morgan. championship game on saturday. one game sent shock waves, the
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big 10 championship. ohio state, punching their ticket in the title game with a win ever michigan stake. they came to play. scores in the first quarter, up 3-0. cook sent a touchdown past and later cook is at it again. this time he'll look for and find a guy named tony the incredible mr lip it for the 33 yard score. braxton miller went around. suddenly gank is not enough in the third. touching down. six wards up. they are up for the first time. >> it was ending on a 17-0 run. 34-24, punching the ticket to the rose ball and knocked ohio
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out of the picture. >> ohio's loss was celebrated in auburn. they were holering louder. auburn football nation new that the buck eyes loss new they could make the game with a win. speaking of share k, quarterback nick marshall shared the ball. he lost two, including this one for an 11-yard score. mason at 194 yards. in the first half auburn led. whatever happened at half-time, it did not work. missouri with the lead. it was mostly auburn from there. mason, corey grant 65 yards. it put the hurt on the 15-yard
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run. within three, in the fourth quarter, two more touchdowns. rushing almost 59-42. afterwards the coach made the case for the receiver to go to the final game. >> we play the toughest schedule of any team and the best football. a lot of teams are not getting better each week. this team is. >> auburn is probably going to the game. top raid florida is going to the game, taking on duke in the battle game. the seminoles never lost. jameis winston finding his legal problems were over. 230 yards and three touch downs. dukes has been a story, but they were no match. the seminoles look to head to
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their b.c. s battle ground since the 2000 season. numbers look strong. 28 touch downs 3800 yards. it remains to be seen how the controversies will upset the voting. >> we finish with a fantastic finish. colorado never beat kansas. three seconds left. shoots for the win, bulls eye. colorado beat kansas 75-72. that's the look at sport. >> thank you john henry smith. i was bummed that duke lost. >> best football season they've had in a while. >> good to here. ji john henry smith with sport. 20 years in the making. an artwork creating controversy
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among environmentalists. the latest on a storm creating dangerous conditions. a live shot of the capitol building in washington d.c. - in the eye of that very storm. tñ
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>> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford live from new york city. >> just ahead, he's a well-known artist. christos later work is facing backlashing from environmentists. why they are upset with a piece that's been in the making for a decade. first a look at the rain and snow withologist -- with metrologist eboni dean. >> snow widespread across the midwest and the great lakes. the snow flakes flying as we speak. much of the day will be on the quiet side. serra cues the only exception.
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around b.c. and baltimore starting with snow and changing to a freezing rain and snow mix. >> the renowned and eclectic artist christo is facing backlash over his project, which is above the arkansas river. some say it will damage the eco system. >> it's called over the river. this is the river, the arkansas in south central colorado. what christo wants to do is suspend hundreds of huge panels of silvery clothe, six miles of it, in eight sections along a 42 mile stretch of the river. his drawings showing how his sunlight will filter through the fabric. the best way to see it is on the
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raft. >> 6,000 rafters will go through. it's creating play of life under the fabric, mixing with the water. up, not down. >> christo and his team have been working on over the river for 20 years and had to get approval from state and federal agencies. most of the project is on protected land. >> christo is raising the 50 million it will cost by selling hundreds of work. christo and his late wife and collaborator became famous for their outlandish projects. over the river is no different. >> thousands of people try to stop us. thousands try to help us.
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there's no way that you can be part of the project. winning or not winning. it created that energy. christian says he and jean clawed travelled over the mounting scouting 89 rivers before deciding this one, the arkansas was perfect. critics of over the river say it was anything but the ideal location. it's on the scale of a mining operation. >> ellen border is the vice president of rags over the rif. they say work to install the anchors, cables and fabric will damage the landscape. >> it's an area in critical . others say they support the project. >> it will create a lot of tension for this part of colorado, and i think it will do
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a lot to put this area on the map. >> assuming christo wins the final round of commonwealth bankling will take two years, and when it's completed over the river will be up for two weeks. christo is famous for outmanoeuvring and outlasting s opponents. at 80 years old over the river could be one of the last works of a long and winding career. >> at the end of our first hour, here is what we are following this morning. a cold snap across much of the country is paralyzing travel on the road and in the air. several deaths have been linked to the icy weather which is bringing snow to the midwest, all the way down to texas. south korea is expanding its defense zone which will overlap with similar zone for china.
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>> the official mourning of nelson mandela has begun. president obama and mrs. obama will attend the furniture on tuesday. it's part of a series of events planned to honour the leader. >> i'm john henry smith, we'll look on a championship saturday in college football. the day that stood up for d.c. s. >> al jazeera continues in 2.5 minutes. i'm morgan radford. i'll be back with all the top stories.
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>> troops on the ground. hundreds of french troops sent to the central african republic trying to restore order. anti-government protesters in the ukraine call for a million-man march trying to get rid of the government. in a day of mourning nelson mandela's ex-wife attended a church service to pay tribe ute to a government. gold snap across the city - smart lander at a stand still. freezing rain and heavy snow - cold snap.
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>> good morning, welcome to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford, live in new york city. the french president issued a veiled warning to the president of the central african republic, francis hollande saying it will be tough to keep him in place given the violence or the ground. 400 have been killed in the past few days. the african union plans to double its forces. 10,000 are being guarded. >> reporters have the latest. jacky rowland is in paris with more on a summit involving african leaders. you may find some of these images in this report disturbing. >> french soldiers on foot patrol in bangui, this is new to the city and welcomed by many. they are here to reassure people
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to open up shop. at the moment there's no food or medicine. there's little the french can do about the growing sectarian violence between muslims and caistians. we muslims have been here for 200 years. anti-balaka militia killed 260 people, they slaughtered us. >> this is where many christians are shelt aring. under the protection. french and african forces. >> there'll be another 2, 5-00 soldiers. they'll head to different parts of the country where hundreds of thousands lost their homes. attacks by the mainly muslim seleka group.
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the hospital is empty now. it used to treat hundreds. friday night in the early hours of saturday is horrific. forces went inside and dragged out injured people here, killing at least 10. nine months ago the rebel group seleka marched into bangui, bringing thousands of foreign fighters. the man that led the rebellion is holed up in the military base and will not accept that power is slipping away. >> how can you call yourself head of state of a country you have no control over. >> translation: it's too much to say i have no control. i control my men. the mep i can't control are not my men. there's score settling after 10 years, all the crimes committed by francois bozize,
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which he has not answered for. >> anti-balaka includes members of the army of former president francois bozize. al jazeera learnt they are outside bangui racing for enforcement. people here are waiting for the next big battle. this time around french and african forces with a chance of presenting more bloodshed. promised to provide logistical and statistical reports to build a force. >> at the end of a 2-game summit the french took the opportunity of having so many leaders to stay on and talk about the pressing subject of the central african republic. the head line to increase the african force to 6,000 troops.
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there were plans for the troops to disarm, troops to go back into their barracks and off the street. there were plans to work to reduce religious tensions and hold a donors conference. part of the reinforceents are an enlargement of the french contingent. president francis hollande has 1600 troops. they are engaged in mali, 3,000 troops there, and 1600 in the central african republic. in the longer terms they want to turn obvious african policing. france is engaged in two countries for some time to come. >> the aim is to pave the way fore elections in 2015. >> prayers and remembrance in
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south africa as mourners gather to remember a man known as madeba. you are looking at live shots of people paying respects in jofi joseph. our reporter is there at a museum dedicated to nelson mandela. he spoke to some visitors gathered there. how are people commemorating. >> in a variety of ways. i talked to a woman a couple of minutes ago on this street. a street festival it has been. i asked if this is a day of sad innocence tore -- or celebration, she said, "a little of both." there was none of that, no crying or tears. there was a sense of celebration and release among the people of south africa. >> here a day of reflection and prayer, which the president called for manifested itself as a street party. we have the self-styled bikers
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that you may hear in the background. 100 or so that have dropped by and are entertaining the kids by bying songs with the accelerators on their bike. >> and a military wing, long sings disbanded but in uniform leading people in chants, "long live nelson mandela", an extraordinary scene on the site of the nelson mandela, house where he lived and is now an historical museum, 100 metres or so from the nelson mandela family restaurant. a few tears for a great man passed, but more looking to the future and people hoping to take this and carry on. >> you mentioned a day of prayer. what are some of the messages this national day of mourning
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of. >> president zoouma calling for a -- jacob zuma calling for a day of prayer and it's thought sinna gogs and churches will talk about nelson mandela. the biggest catholic church in a largely christian country said the message is simple - nelson mandela paved the way, now we have to walk the path. that was his message to everybody, 1,000 or so gathered as a congregation. that was his message. he did great things. we have to honour him by taking them and moving ahead. >> thank you so much. >> while south africa conditions to celebrate the life and legacy of nelson mandela many acknowledge that lasting impact of years of forced racial separation. al jazeera's correspondent met to meet an interracial couple to
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talk about the task of racial integration that lies ahead. >> this couple are married. during apartheid relationships between whites and nonwhites prosecutor illegal. nelson mandela fought four equality. now they don't have to hide their relationship. being a mixed couple still have challenges. >> people accept that we are married, but not this close. it's okay to work and have coffee with someone. when it gets personal it's a bit weird. that's what i think, people haven't lived and that's what i find is uncomfortable. racism is a problem.
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some blacks don't like whites, some whites don't like blacks. one of our friends, there was whites, blacks, coloureds having a good time. he said, "i wish south africa was like this." and that is my south africa, how i experience it. >> the ban on mixed marriages was scrappeded. one of the early reforms signalling the end of rule and nelson mandela's release from prison. >> nelson mandela died on thursday. people are leaving cards and flowers at a house where he passed away. >> this used to be a white neighbourhood. usually the blacks were the gardeners or the house maids. reconciliation is still a work in progress. nelson mandela will be buried on sunday, 15 december. >> it's up to south africa to
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make the dream of rech job silliation a reality. >> a recent survey of racial and social attitudes in south africa showed that less than 40% of south africans socialise with > hundreds of thousands out in the streets as protests in ukraine continue into a third straight week. demonstrations were sparked by ukraine's decision to shelve n e.u. agreement in favour of a russian one. >> a new government is hoping to >> a car bomb attack on a police station in col up -- col um bia. behind the attack. the blast destroyed the police station and other buildings. farc leaders and columbian officials are engaged in peace
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talks, but are trying to end a 50-year war that has taken more than 200,000 lies. >> a team of u.n. weapons inspectors are expected to arrive in iran. it will be the first time that a u.n. team has been able to visit the site in two years. meanwhile president obama said the pursuit of a longstanding deal with iran to monitor its weapons is likely to fail as it is to succeed. he was talking at a pro-israel forum in washington. iran will roll back it's enrichment of uranium, which can be used to build a nuclear bomb, but also to generate energy. >> we have to not constantly assume that it's not possible r possible for iran, like any country to change over time. it may not be likely. if you ask me what is the
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likelihood at us arriving at the end state that i described earlier, i wouldn't say that it's more than 50/50. we have to try. >> iran, the u.s. and five other world powers will meet in the coming days to discuss a 6-month agreement. >> we are cracking a storm system creating problems. let's bring in metrologist eboni dean. >> i'm tracking a storm system in the east and a storm system across the west that will make its way east ward, merging with the system in place. it will create more travel woes across the north-east and great lakes. now. we have a wide area dealing with the snow showers. there's an icy part of it. then as we get the snow changing over to freezing, we could end
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up with a tenth of an inch to a quarter of an inch of ice stretching from virginia, north carolina up to pennsylvania. this is something we'll need to watch as conditions deteriorate. once you get the ice to accumulate, that's when we are talking about power outages and trees coming down or limbs. with this amount of ice that we are expecting it will be a nuisance until we get afl an nsh of ice. as we go through the day, it's gold. moisture starts to make its way northwards, interacting with cold air. snow expected in new york city. it won't stick around all that long. behind it we'll get the wintry mix and it will change to rain. more of a wintry mix before we get the rain. temperatures moderate on monday. >> south korea expand its air
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defense zone fuelling intentions. concerns that protests in thailand may be sizzling as the prime minister tries to quell the anger.
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>> welcome back. i'm morgan radford. there are growing concerns about the bird flu virus that has killed some in china. they are watching here in the for americans. first, a look at the weather. >> we are starting with the heart of the coldest air, temperatures down to the single digits, stretching to montana where we are sitting at minus 14, as we go through the day we lds of 25-35. ng with it will be a cold one to watch across the north-east. around philadelphia we are expecting to see the snow showers changing to rain on monday. if the snow is not sitting around, temperatures back to the
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mid 40s, dropping to the 30s. we'll be on a roller-coaster ride. highs and lows m cold but we will moderate. the warmest air back in florida. >> increasing tensions in asia where south korea raidses the stakes, announcing it will expand its air defense zone. the seen and chinas areas overlap covering disputed territory between those two countries. health officials in hong kong are looking for people that have been in contact with an 80-year-old man that has bird flu. the virus doesn't appear to be easily containous between humans. as reported, cautions are taken as more than a third of those that have caught the flu died.
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>> china is on high alert. the world health organization says that since march of this year there has been a total of 45 deaths from a strain of bird influenzaa called h-7 and 9. result in the influenzaa going from the bird to the human. when the person is infected it is serious. >> that is why hong kong shut down live poultry mark et cetera and suspended chickens from naturals in mainland china. there's no evidence that the strain spreads from human to humans, there are fears that is could. >> they are taking this very seriously. one of the reasons they are doing it is that influenzaa - this strain of influenzaa in birds does not make the bird
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sick. you can't follow the sick birds. on the campus the front lines for the strain over in china wanted by the national institute of health, there's a team of doctors and scientists working to treat people around the world. >> three months ago dr katherine edwards joined the search. >> the chinese were good about sharing the virus with the who and with the c.b.c. so that we could begin to grow the virus. in the test trials they affected 200 people with varying levels. it led to a development of a vaccine. researchers know that while china is 8,000 miles away a global food pandemic could be on the doorstep at any time. >> it used to be if something
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happened in china we wouldn't see it for a long time. any of these pandemics are playing right away. >> americans should know that the public health infrastructure that we have this the united states is alert to this. we are all tuned in, on top of this and watching it carefully. >> as test trials continue at vanderbilt should the disease spread. >> most of the flu cases were reported in march and april of this year, with virtually no new cases over the summer. as the traditional flu season is back, there's fear the bird flu may come back. >> a major breakthroe in the fight against cancer. an speerntal treatment --
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experimental treatment could be a cure for leukaemia. success rates have been stunning. >> to thailand where the main opposition party says it's resigning from parliament, throwing the country into crisis as protesters take to the streets on monday. in the past this unrest might have held thailand's military to seize power. veronica pedrosa has more on the choice facing the thai military. thailand's milita on photo opportunity duty. this parade part of the celebrations for the king's birthday. the military and the monarchy, two institutions that ruled the country centre stage and behind the scenes over the years. now people in bangkok are once again seeing scenes of violence like this. the question being asked is
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thailand's military prepared to stage i don't remember cout de ta the 12th in 80 years. the thai army headquarters is surrounded by protesters. for now the soldiers are staying in their barrack. this could be a transformative moment in thai politics. whatever decision the army takes about what to do next, could be the crucial factor. what the military wants is a matter of debate. we spoke to a top security official who asked not to be identified and he told us some protesters are soldiers. >> did you say some of the protesters were soldiers. >> yes. all units have traineded the people using m 16. >> back in 2010 during mass demonstrations there was talk about how the military was
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trying to provoke violence. >> i think they need to accept the fact that thailand has changed. we cannot go back to the old days where the country was having other troubles. >> the last time the military grabbed power in 2006 it was from thaksin shinawatra. it tried to return it to the people. the current prime minister thaksin's sister has tried to amend it. some say the military wants it back by using what looks like a people's revolution. >> translation: the army can't put up with this situation. >> how likely is it that there'll be another coup? >> i cannot say. the next if you months will tell in the military is ready to march to a new and different
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tune. >> democratic party is protesting what it calls the ilget massy of the thai government. >> venezuelans go to the polls. they'll vote in the first regional elections since hugo chavez died in march. the new president has done little to arrest food short ints and sky rocketing inflation. >> polarized, venezuelans go back to the polls to elect municipal and mayoral representatives. a majority of seats, five years ago was won by hugo chavez's party. the opposition hopes to do better. >> translation: there's a growing number of people in the middle. sunday people should cast a vote, punishing the government. >> there are significant food shortages. crime in the capital is urge issing. at 54% inflation is one of the
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highest in the world. the economic crisis is growing. >> translation: we are dangerously dependent on oil. we have used them without saving. it's caused a fat expansion of cash while the international reserves fall. >> in a country, for many venezuelans economic policies are failing. 62% say the government is inefficient. the election will show how loyal people continue to be to the government's party. >> and that is the case for 65 jooerld retiree. he says he juggled every day to find food for his mother and wife. you have to go around to find products. i'll vote for a government
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candidate because food is rising because owners are hoarding them. >> others say people are still in favour because the opposition doesn't have a clear agenda. >> translation: they don't tell people how they will ensure private property and invest in a >> in the last presidential election the government won by one percentage point. in a country emerging in an economic crisis it feels like a retched um -- like a referendum. >> as the war in syria rages on, reports surface now that a rebel group associated with al qaeda may be holding a group of nuns
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hostage. more americans joining the workforce. what the latest job numbers mean for the economy and politically. >> i'm john henry smith. a big-10 championship game. highlights ahead in sports.
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>> welcome back. you're watching al jazeera i'm morgan radford with your top stories. >> south korea announces an expansion of its air defence zone, covering an area covered by beijing and tokyo. china came under criticism of the the move by south korea had been expected and goes into effect on december 15th. >> a cold sap is gripping the heartland and is responsible for several deaths, including the driver of this s.u.vl who lost
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control and slid off a bridge in texas. the storm is moving east recollects expected to bring airport delays. >> a day of mourning in south africa as the nation in the world paid tribute to nelson nelson mandela's ex-wife and jacob zuma attended church service in his honour. u.s. president barack obama, bush, carter and clinton will travel to south africa for memorial services. >> a rebel group tied to al qaeda is demanding the release of detainees. it's holding at least 12 nuns hostage. they were moved from a town damaged in fighting between rebels and government forces. >> this is the christian village north-east of damascus. it's under the control of rebels from the free syrian army. they drove out government troops six days ago.
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>> after we regained control, the regime's forces targeted the churches and mosques. >> during the battle roads and buildings were damaged. the growth orthodox church is standing. the convent did not fare well. >> as you can see the convent was shelleded by tanks and rocket launches and suffered damage and the convent and the mosque met the same fate. >> the rebels took a dozen nuns out of here to the nearby town. the rebels say they moved the nuns for their own protection and they'll be released. some say fighters from the al-nusra front are demanding 1,000 women and children be freed. >> the entire city has been raided. we didn't find civilians, just
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12 nuns and a deacon. we have taken them up, by the grace of god, to a safe shelter. >> this is one place where people speak ar make. theno carrierringringconnect 190
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..this can be a choppy report. we'll have to see what december's report it. >> of course, tis the season to be merry, holiday shopping, will that give a lift heading into the new year. consumer confidence is high. people are spending but they are being careful. people are looking for deals. as we see them come in we'll
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probably see more spending. thak you, kevin. >> john henry smith is here with sport headlines and he will give us a look at the college football scene. he's here looking at the key college game and will tell us about philadelphia. that is coming soon. >> absolutely i will be in philadelphia for the eagles-lions game. coverage on al jazeera. now we are talking college football. it was championship game saturday. there was a game that could send shock waves. a win over michigan. they came to play. for the first time this season - 72 yards for a touch down.
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cook at it again. michigan state up 17-0. early in the second half miller they were late first. miller with a second touch down. six yards out. 24 unanswered points from the buck eyes, and it was party on time. michigan state ended on a 17-nothing run and starting to bin 34-24 to punch a ticket to the rose ball, knocking ohio state out of the b.c. s picture. across the football nations, the buckeyes loss. tiger on tiger. number 3 and number 5 share a nickname. nick marshall shared the ball
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with missouri three time via a fumble. losing two of them. mason 194 yard and two scores in the first. auburn 28-27 at the break. whatever was said the half-time did not work. corey grant at 55 yards, that score. put the hurt on the tigers and missouri with a 15-yard scoring run. franklin ending the third. putting them within three. in the fourth mason time, scoring two more shutdowns. going with a challenge conference game, auburn wins. afterwards. made the case for his time. >> we played the toughest schedule of any of teams and played our best football.
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a lot of teams are not getting better. this one is. >> auburn is probably one of the best games, florida state is going to the big game, taking on duke. the seminoles never lost to duke and they still haven't. jameis winston fresh off finding out his legal problems are behind him. duke has been one of college football's great stories. they were no match. seminoles look to be heading to the first b.c. s final game since the 2000 season. let's check out the numbers. 38 touchdowns for jameis winston. leading florida into contention for a national contention. it remains to be seen how the off the field controversies affect the voting. 17 and 2, 14 wins against losing
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team. started a 3-game gauntlet. saturday they took the floor at san antonio take the the spurrs. and budding superstar. a game-high 28. tuesday they host the heat. i'll be at the game. look for the report from ind yappo lis. >> it's a growing problem on streets, people riding without their helmets. that's why a pair of swedish designers are hoping to revolutionize biking with fashion. i quite like it. >> cycling is a big part of life in freedom. 80% ride bikes for commute and pleasure. only a third wear helmets. >> i never cycle with a helmet
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on my head. i crash with a helmet once and i cracked in two pieces. >> we learnt to ride a bike and never used a helmet. >> two industrial design students decided to create a helmet people wanted to wear. this was born and mixes high tech with fashion. >> they want something discrete, something that went with their personal style. a lot of vanity issues. people were asking for something inadvice -- invisible. unlike a helmet you zip it up.
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ride. >> it has patterns to determine when i cyclist will crash. >> each year 300 people sustain head injuries in cycling accidents. any initiative to project drivers is welcome. >> there is 20 or 30 killed every year. it's worrying. we are working now to increase e they've been deployed it can't be reusable. at 540 a piece some see it as an ex-pennsive investment innovate ors hope it will become a part of a sick lifts uniform and turn bike safety on its head. >> according to the institute for highway safety 75% of adult
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cyclists killed were not wearing helmets. >> no tobacco, smoke or smell. a real risk. >> 20 years in the making, an artwork creating controversy by environmentalists. >> i'm tracking storms. i'll let you know where they are heading next.
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>> welcome back to al jazeera america for a look at a major storm headed for the east coast. let's bring in metrologist. >> the cold air is in space. it's surging northwards. the moisture is lifting north. we are starting to see a little more in the way of snow moving to virginia and a wintry mix. we'll see in d.c. and baltimore, a few numbers of, one to two inches.
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right now we are not seeing a lot of that, maybe snow showers, and not a lot of troops. that will change as we go through the morning. rain has been abundant, travelling along i 40. freezing rain has ended around memphis. >> the renowned and eclectic artists is facing backlash over its latest problem. it's to suspend fabric high above the arkansas river. some say it will damage the eco system. >> it's called over the river and this is the river. the arkansas in south central colorado. what crystal wants to do is suspend huge panels of cloth, six miles of it in eight sections along a 42 mile stretch of the river. drawings show how the sunlight filters through. the best way to see it is
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underneath on a raft drifting through the canyon. >> 300,000 rafters go down the arkansas river. it will be spectacular to see the space. it's creative play of life into the fabric, reflecting the water. >> christo and his team have been working on over the river for more than 20 years and had to get approval from state and federal agencies. most of the project is on protected land. christo is raising the 50 million it will cost by selling hundreds of preparatory works which he makes by hand. christo and his late wife became famous for their outsides and some say outlandish projects. every one is outlandish. >> all have a journey.
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thousand people try to help us. even in some ways, in the position, they are part of the project, willing or not willing, you are related to the project and created the energy. >> christ scro says he and jean clawed travelled over the mound ans scouting -- mountains scouting 89 rivers before deciding this is perfect. critics say this is anything but the ideal location. >> on the scale of a mining operation. >> this is the vice president of roar - rags over the arkansas river. they are taking legal action taking legal action saying that it will damage the landscape. >> it's a major construction project in an area of critical environmental concerned.
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>> christos team say they'll minimise the damage. >> others support it. >> it will create a lot of tension, but it will do a lot to put the area on the map. >> assuming christo wins the round of legal wrangling, construction will take two years. when completed over the river will be up. christo is famous for outmanoeuvring and out lasting his opponents. at 80 years old over the river could be one of the last works. >> christo is working on a project in the united arab emirates where he plans on creating a scup pt tur out of oil barless. >> elian gonzalez is back in the spotlight after being caught in a tug of war between relatives
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in the u.s. and his father in cuba. now he speaks out about his upbringing. >> translation: i have lived happy in cuba for 14 yearsment let there be no doubt. whoever is interested in this, i am happy living in cuba. >> he made the comment while attending a student conference in ecuador. he says he does not forgive his american relatives for trying to keep him in the u.s. and calls on president obama to lift the embargo on cuba. >> people in washington state celebrated a unique anniversary. celebrating when marnal your legalize took effect. smoking in the treat are not d. washington and colorado is the only u.s. state where recreational use of marnal is
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legal. >> electronic cigarettes are safer and less intrusive. utah and other places regulate them like tobacco. >> electronic cigarettes are so popular they are all the store here sells. no tobacco, just vaper. >> it's a step in a smarter room. >> raymond padilla says it was smarter for him. >> this is the only thing that worked. >> these cigarettes don't have the tar. it delivers the active ingredients of marijuana if you want. they are catching on with kids. >> intuitively these are nicotine delivery systems with dozens of chemicals. the odds that this is a harmless activity and harmless for those
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taking in second hand vapours are small. >> the los angeles city council passed a law requiring a licence to sell these cigarettes and banses sales on the streets. it's to discourage sales to minors. the cigarettes are markets to children, and especially flavours like bubble gum which you are not allowed to do. three states are treating them ke cigarettes. 100 cities, los angeles among them are beginning to restrict the cigarettes. los angeles is considering another bill banning the use of escripts in places where tobacco is prohibited. the "the los angeles times" said h evidence of harm. they wrote fear is not a good basis for regulation.
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research is. government agencies should be wary of overreacting. it's not an overreaction according to the lung association. >> we don't know what the dangers of using them might be. we want to her on the side of caution. >> it's fine to keep e-cigarettes away from kids, but it is feared that overregulation will drive smokers back to tobacco. we are trying to help people get off tobacco products. >> the free-willing days of electronic cigarettes may be a look at what is coming out of that device. re expected to double to 1.7 million, a fraction of $80 million that traditional cigarettes bring in. the end of the second hour, here is what we are following: a cold snap across the country is perilizing travel in the road
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and in the air. >> south korea announce ex-anding an pair defense zones overlapping with china's. >> official mourning for nelson mandela. the white house says pam yes and mrs. obama will attend a memorial on tuesday. >> it's an exciting conference - a day that shook up the b.c. s. >> i'm tracking rain, snow and where you'll see dangerous >> we sustain in just a minute.
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>> frozen solid - major american cities at a standstill as an ice storm drifts across the country with its sites set on the east coast. >> south korea expands its air space zone increasing tensions in the region. >> boots on the ground - hundreds of french troops sent to central african republic. >> nelson mandela's family shares their grief. the first lady plans to travel to south africa for the memorial with president obama.
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>> welcome to al jazeera america. i'm richelle carey. >> officially much of the country is experiencing wintry temperatures. the major heardland took a beating from a storm. it's heading to the east coast. experts say it will last a day, but they are expecting snow, ice and rain. boston countries are preparing for lots of rain and 6 inches of snow. a wintry blast knocked out power and flights in idaho. >> a severe cold snap is blanketing the mid tox. in louisville texas an ice patch sent a driver out of control
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into the freezing waters. the driver was kill. rescue teams called in to pick up the truck. >> they had to get in the water and lift it out. >> from texas to oklahoma, turned over trucks, traffic black ice forcing drivers to creep along roadways. conditions so bad that people are braving the temperatures, walking to work. the freezing weather knocking out power at dallas fort worth international airport. 400 flict cancelled. setting up camps on the floor. hunker down. >> a foot of snow fell in illinois. the storm strexed into minnesota, and north dakota where temperatures hover above zero.
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i second storm in the west set record lows. several tide in hypothermia. a million dollars worth of citrus damaged. back east there weren't cars on the streets. there's no admission. one young woman is making the best of a blast, lacing up skates and taking to the streets. >> we'll check in on the forecast shortly. increasing tensions in asia. south korea raising the stakes, expanding its air defense zone after a move by china. the south korean and chinese zones overlap. they were talk to neighbours to make sure therefore no accidents. >> it's a direct response to china's expansion of its air defense zone. the extension overlaps south
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korea's air defense zone as well as pertinently japan's one. there is a heated dispute between china and japan over the senkakku islands or the diaoyu island. there is an area including an undersea reef. there is a south korean research station that's been built on that. it has a south korean helipad and is under de facto south korean control. because of an accident of history when the americans drew the defense zone, it didn't include that area. it's an opportunity for south korea to write who many were surprised to see was the current situation, extending its zone allowing for an ease of military operation within the zone.
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the south korean government making it clear that it's going things in a different way to beijing which made the announcement. it's saying that it consulted with the neighbours and the u.s. and doing things in a regularized way. >> the french president issued a veiled warning to the president of the central african republic. francis hollande said it will be tough to keep is in place given worsening violence. hundreds of people have been killed. france is distracting troops and plans to double its forces. >> 10,000 flood the capital. everyone has been ordered off the streets except for foreign peacekeepers and the presidential guard. others have the latest on the crisis. we start with bangui. a barning - some of the viewers
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may find the images disturbing. >> french soldiers on foot patrol in bangui. good news for the city and welcomed by many. they are here to reassure people enough to open up shots. at the moment there's no food or medicine. there is a little the french should do. between growing violence between muslims and christians. we muslims have been here for 200 years. anti-balaka militias killed for than 250 people, this is where many christians are sheltering. >> they are under the protection of french and african forces. there will be another 2,500 african soldiers here soon, heading to different parts of the country where hundreds of thousands of people have lost
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their homes. too late for the people in this hospital. it was evacuated after attacks by the fighters from mainly muslim seleka groups. the hospital is empty, used to treat hundreds. what happened on friday night and the early hours of saturday is horrific. seleka forces went inside and dragged out injured people, killing at least 10. nine months ago the rebel group seleka marched into bangui bringing thousands of foreign fighters with it. the man that led the rebellion is holed up in the military base and won't accept that power is slipping away. >> how can you call yourself a head of state of a country you have absolutely no control over? >> it's too much to say i have
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no control. i control my men. the men i can't control are not my men. there is settling after 10 years, all the crimes committed that have been been answered for. >> anti-balaka includes members of the army. al jazeera has learnt that they are now outside bangui, waiting for reinforcements. people here are waiting for the next big battle. this time around the french and african sources have a chance of protecting more bloodshed. >> iran promised to provide logistical support. >> we report on those developments. >> at the end of the 2-day summit the french took the opportunity of having so many african leaders to say on and
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talk about the pressing subject the central african republic. the head line that came out was to increase the african forces. there were plans for the troop to disarm rebels to get the militia back into their barracks and bases, get the armed men off the streets. in the longer term they plan to work on reducing interreligious tensions. now, part of the reinforcements are an enlargement of the french contingent. president francis hollande announced 1600 french troops in france engaged in hali, in africa. 3,000 troops there and 1600 in the central african republic. in the longer term they want to turn over african policing. for the time france is engaged
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in two countries for some time to come. >> prayer and remembrance in south africa as mourners gather to remember a man known as madeba. that is quite a scene. we go to a museum dedicated to nelson mandela. it's about history, remembering people, and lessons. we see different generations of people gathering, people bringing young children, those that don't know about nelson mandela and his legacy. they were not there in the '60s, '70s, and '80s, how are they passing this on? >> that's what the next few days is about, letting young south africans know who nelson mandela
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was, what apartheid was, the changes that came about, about the work that remained. today was a day of reflection and prayer by jacob zuma. in churches and temples across the country services have been held. we are just a couple of miles for orlando stadium in soweto. that'll be the site of a mainly junior memorial service. president obama and other world leaders will attend. on sunday the funeral service will be held. nelson mandela will be buried in qunu, his home village, it was be a small affair. people will learn to educate the yawning as to whoa he was. >> it's are remarkable scope. what are the messages coming in from religious leaders?
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>> well, you can put it simply. from father sebastian at the largest catholic church in soweto, he told me a couple of hours ago that nelson mandela paved the way. now we need to walk it. his sermon is we can live back to the past, let's take what he did and move ahead. that's a basic message religious leaders are having over the country. here in soweto all the reflection and prayers is manifesting itself in a massive and joyful street scope. we have seep seen parade, dancing and sipping. >> it's quite a scene. a week of ceremonies before
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nelson mandela's burial next sunday. today is a day of prayer outside of nelson mandela's home. a memorial will be held on tuesday with leaders from around the world, including president obama and former presidents, george w. bush, jimmy carter and bill clinton. >> a map who defended his imprisonment is speaking out about his leg as yip. when manned -- legacy. when nelson mandela was freed he insisted that he serve in the government. we talk about this unique relationsh relationship. >> this man helped to keep nelson mandela in gaol. and then he served under him. it was his task to defend the imprisonment of nelson mandela
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privately he long lobbied for nelson mandela's release. >> in june 1982 i submitted a memorandum prepared by my department, to the effect that nelson mandela ought to be released. we are making a martyr of him every day he stays in prison. that his international acclaim and status would grow to an extent where we would not be able to handle it. unfortunately at the time it was shot down. >> eight years later nelson mandela became a free man. here you had a man that spent 27 years in prison, and the day the - he displayed the energy to
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the person who has been a president before. amazing what insight in the minds of people and for that matter into world affairs. >> central to the success of the negotiation process that led to a peaceful transfer of power was nelson mandela insistence that there be no losers, they all be winners. >> we handed over power, but we did not capitulate. you do not capitulate and surrender when you do the right thing. you libberate yourself. that's what we did. it was not a capitulation, it was liberation. >> and a man who said he was liberated quotes from a statement nelson mandela made
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during his trial. >> have changed the ideal of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony with equal opportunities. he concluded by saying it is an ideal which i hope to live for and achieve, but if needs be, it is an ideal for which i'm prepared to die. having fought white domination, aving fought black domination. it was that balance that enabled interests of the country that the blacks need the blacks and
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the whites needs the blacks. that is nelson mandela. that is his legacy. >> a team of u.n. weapons inspectors arrived in iran to tour a nuclear facility. the first time a u.n. team visited the site in more than two years. president obama said the pursuit of a longstanding deal with iran is as likely to fail as succeeded. forum in washington. iran agreed to temporarily wind back its enrichment which can be used to make a bomb, but also le used in the making of nuclear energy. >> we have to not constantly assume that it's not possible
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for rain, like any country to change over type of. it may not be likely. if you ask me what is the likelihood for us to arrive at the end state i described earlier, i wouldn't say it's more than 50/50, but we have to try. >> iran, the u.s. and other world powers will meet in the coming days. iran's president said it's a deal and sanctions have already benefitted the country's economy. korea returns home. he speaks after being freed. reunited with his family. >> elian gonzalez speaks out about a request he's making to president obama about his home county, cuba. >> ukrainians ultimate mate um
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to their president to end the conflict. tñ
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>> good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm richelle carey. next, after weeks of being held in north korea a u.s. veteran is home in america re united with his family. in a moment we'll hear from merrill newman. first a look at the temperatures across the county. metrologist eboni dean has that. i'm not the metriologist, but i know it's coal. >> you don't need a scientific background to know you'll feel the chill the minute you step outside. much of the nation below average. it's feeling more like we are in the minus 40s. it's a day where we need to layer up. cold conditions. here across the upper midwest wind chill advisory. here in the north-east, in the 20s. new york watching for snow.
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long. it will switch over to freezing rain. cold air returning by the middle of the week. >> a veteran held by north korea has returned home to his family in california. north korea detained merrill newman in october while he was visiting his grounds where he fought 50 years ago. >> merrill newman made the trip to north korea, he would not have known awe difficult a journey it would turn outline of the after weeks of detention he's back in the u.s., looking healthy with his wife by his side and a simple message. it's been a great homecoming. i'm tired, bit he was my family. thank you all for the support. very much appreciated.
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>> merrill newman was a soldier in a korean war. his visit was a long planned vacation. he was no ordinary soldier. this concession video was released, admitting an affiliation to the white tigers. for newman the war was ancient history, for north korea, mill tarized and at the ready to fight imperialists. the two countries hadn't signed a peace treaty and technically are at war. why north korea decided to let north korea go now is a mystery. >>. >> after he's had some rest he'll have more to say about his usual and difficult journey. for now i ask for you to be with
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him as a family and that you got forget another american held in the cprk. the american caught spreading the word of christian ta. considering the unpredict ability it was never be clear when he let go. >> the senior barack obama administration official said the release was a result of contact between the u.s. and pyongyang. >> a kooub scrp boy caught in a -- cuban boy caught in a tug of war speaks out saying he's happy for his cuban upbringing.
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>> translation: i have lived happy in cuba for 14 years, let there be no doubt. whoever is interested in this, i'm happy living in cuba. >> elian gonzalez made the comment whilst attending a student conference in ecuador. the first time he left the country since being handed back to his father. he does not forgive his american family for trying to keep him in the u.s. >> the los angeles city council is thinking with new laws in relation to e-cigarettes. >> electronic cigarettes are so popular they are all that this store sells. no tobacco for smoke. it's called vaping. >> it should be viewed as a good thing.
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it's a step in a smarter direction. >> it was a smart move for him. i tried patches and guns. this is the only thing that worked. >> these cigarettes can deliver nico teep and the active ingredients of marijuana. they are catching on with kids. >> these are nicotine delivery systems with dozens of odds that this is harmless and harmless for those taking in the second hand vapours is small. the los angeles city council passed a law that requires a licence to sell the grets and ban sales on the streets. it's to discourage sales to minors. it's marketed to young people and with flavours like bubble
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>> regulation is beginning to catch up. three states is treating them like cigarettes. three states are banning them. los angeles is considering a rule banning them where cigarettes would be banned. the "the los angeles times" said there's not enough evidence of harm in cigarettes that restrict them. fear is not a good basis for regulation, research is. until there's more conclusive research government agencies should be aware of overreaction. >> we do not know what the danger ertion of losing them might be, we want to air on the side of caution. >> it's fine to keep e-cigarettes away from kids, but it's feared over-reg u laghts will drive spokers back to tobacco. >> we are trying to get them off
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tobacco product. government agencies take a closer look at what is coming out of the device. >> remembering nelson mandela, the people around the world remember the late south african leader, morgan radford has a personal story and an interview with his grandson. honouring those that lost their lives, thousands pay respects at the pearl harbour attacks. >> i'm john henry smith, riddle me this - what is the latest team to go four straight b.c.f.? the answer may surprise you. the answer in sports.
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>> welcome back. i'm richelle carey, these are the top stories. a severe cold snap is gripping the nation. the driver of this s.u.vl was killed when he lost control and slid off a bridge in texas.
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a major storm is moving eastwards bringing messy conditions and airport delays. a day of mourning in south africa as the nation and the world paid tribute to nelson mandela. his ex-wife winnie mandela and jacob zuma attended a church service on sunday. president obama and bush and africa for mem -- memorial services. peole have been sharing their stories. for some it's personal. morgan radford spent time had his family and will tell us about that. >> that's right. i had the privilege of interviewing nelson mandela's grandson about his legacy. >> in 2012 i interviewed nelson mandela's grand son who went to
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live with nelson mandela when he was 11 years old. >> before he became president in "93 i stayed with him, basically since "93. >> he told me about the first time he met his grandfather when he was behind bars serving his sentence. >> i was eight or nine. my parents told me we were going to see my grandfather. >> nelson mandela had been moved to a housing gaol. it was in a poor area of soweto. >> when we got to the place, it had a vcr. a beautiful house, as well as a pool. i was like, "wow, when i grow up i want to go to gaol." i thought that's how people lived. i thought i wanted to be like my grandfather and go to gaol, because this is the life. a convict he was not. he laughs about it now, but he said he, like the country was
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forever changed. >> the legacy is still very much alive in our country. just in a different way. it was a brutal violent system for our system, was apartheid. we are fighting to present a positive image of our country, continent and people. >> that image of africa is what his grandfather tried to redefine. >> you know, he came out of there and he said, "i don't want to take revenge, i want to create peace and move forward, bring development for my people. and so if you look at his legacy, one can say a person with compassion should be able to define what is africa, what do we represent and what is our
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history? >> that is the task ahead of him as a south african, a young person. >> for me, i'm tping what has been started. >> continuing something for a man whose legacy, it seems is it good hands. >> he has formed a foundation africa rising focussing on the future. >> it was a fascinating conversation. he sounds like his grandfather. what other ways do they remind you of each other? you of each other? >> they are tall. nelson mandela, i walked in the room and he greets me with a, "how are you young lady?", and they sounded so similar. growing up under my grandfather, he said he learnt what he taught the country.
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on a personal level he taught him what it meant to forgive and rewriting a narrative. it was a powerful lesson we can all learn. >> a car bomb attack on a police station in columbia killed eight people. it happened in a sound south-east of booingo tea. it's suspected that rebel fighters farc were behind the attack. the blast destroyed a police station and other buildings. farc leaders are engaged in police talks trying to end a 50 year war that has taken more than 200,000 wives. >> the latest move in ukraine is tacking the country into crisis. in the past thailand's military may have seized power.
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we have more on the choice facing the thai military. >> thailand's military on photo opportunities. this parade is part of celebrations for the king's birthday. the military and monarchy two institutions that ruled centre stage and behind the scenes. now people in bangkok are once again are seeing violence like this. the questions asked is thailand's military prepared to stage a kout de ta. >> the thai army hours is surrounded by protest tors. this could be a transformative moment in thai politics. whatever decisionses the army takes about what to do next could be the crucial factor. >> what the military wants is a
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matter of debate. we spoke to a security official who asked not to be identified and told us some protesters were soldiers. >> did you say some of the protesters are soldiers? >> yes. [ inaudible ] >> back in 2010 during mass demonstrations there was talk about how the military promoted violence and used it as an excuse. >> thailad has changed. we can't go back to the times when the country was control by a small group of people. >> the last time the military grabbed power in 2006 it was centre thaksin shinawatra. it then tried to return it to the people. the current prime minister
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thaksin's sister tried to amend it. the military wanted it back. >> translation: the army can't put up with this situation. if you can't solve the political problem. >> how likely is it there'll be another coup? >> i kaecannot say. >> the next few months will tell whether the military can march to a diften tune. >> the democratic party protests the ilget massy of the government. pearl harbour was attacked. it was known as a di of infamy. >> the u.s. was pushed into world war ii after the japanese bombed the harbour.
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>> 70 world war ii veterans gathered. the ceremony was tore the ceremony of the uss "arizona." it sank, killing 1200. >> new concerns for those applying for federal healthcare. officials are discouraging people for submitting the paper applications, worried they would not be processed in time to have coverage start in january. a potentially major breakthrough in a fight against cancer. doctors in new orleans could mean a cure more leukaemia. there's treatment of a gene therapy to alter white blood cells to attack the cancer cells. doctors say it's stunning in tests so far. >> leaders in russia made commitment to help polar bears flif and survive.
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the five countries manage their habitat. addressing the effects of shrinking vis and increasing industrial interest. joining us is jeff york head of the polar bear conservation program. thank you so much for your time. >> thank you. >> climate change, and industrial interests as well. how are they affecting polar bears. >> basically climate change is pulling the rug out from polar bears. it is also changing the thick possess, making the arctic eye pack less active or stable. >> tell us something we may not know about polar bears? >> for sure. they are really what we call lipidvoys. or fat eaters.
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polar bears live on fat. their primary pray is linfield. they are specialised. >> what would you say is the projection for the future of polar bears in the arctic. how optimistic are you? >> long-term projections is clear, based on the best available climates, ice. we know by the end of the century, polar bear population across the arctic will de-clicl if we don't take action. >> what can be done along that vein? >> sure, a big thing is nations around the world can take actions between now and the next climate conference in paris in 2015. it will take that global
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agreement on climate to save the icy poll. in the shorter term we can manage some of the industrial developments that are pushing into the arctic, making sure they occur properly in the right places and in the right ways. managing harvests and reducio co human polar bear numbers. >> can you see more of a conflict between humans and bears? where is it coming from. >> the ice retracts in the summer time. we are seeing the push or bears are having to leave the ice and coming to shore where they are waiting for the ice to come back. being on shore puts them in closer proximity to communities. they'll come and investigate the areas and some of the bears who
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are hungry and are looking for food. >> hopefully we can reverse some of these trends. >> thank you jeff for joining us. joining us from canada. appreciate it. >> thank you. >> jith -- john henry smith here with sport with an unusual day. we say that every week. >> it was championship day saturday. one day that could send shock waves through the b.c. s and that is the campionship. ohio could punch their ticket to the b.c. s, put hats were centred on. cook tossing to keith. 73 yard touchdown. later cook is at it again, looking for mr tony lifford and
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find him. michigan 17-0. they cut the lead to seven at the break. early in the 7th. miller left-hand. suddenly this game is up. layer in the third. 24 unanswered points. from there results all the time. ending on a 17-0 run. michigan punches the ticket to the rose ball. knocking it out of the state. >> they were holorring. the buckeyes losing much tiger on tiger. missouri shared the nickname.
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he fumbled three times, lost two of them. >> mason with 195 yards m auburn led 28-27. adjustments at half time did not work. >> 304 yards rushing. four tvs. auburn 59-42. snow auburn is probably going to the b.c. s game. talking on duke in the a.c.c. title game. the seminoles never lost and have not. finding out legal troubles are over. going for 330 yards. great stories. but no match for the opposition.
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there's no official 12 championship games, but oklahoma were trying to punch their b.c. s ticket. all they had to do was beat the rival oklahoma. but the sooners had a plan. they can out the goal. in the final minute they go ahead. the schooners on top. now that made what could be matt brown's coaching at the championship game later in the day. sent out in style. flimping. the pack 12 championship, number 12 - with not much of a contest. 133 yard.
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three scores in all much 38-14. they are rose ball bound. they are back to back. stamford the fifth program. b cs appearances. that is sport. >> all right. hundreds of thousands are on the streets of kiev as protests continue in independence square, and seizing government buildings. the demonstrations sparked by ukraine's decision to not sign up to an e.u. agreement. let's go to key -- kiev where there is r there are crowds. the crowds are massive. way sort of support are we
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expecting in? >> it is certainly chilly here. i'm not a professional headcounter. but i can tell you that there has been tens of thousands gathering in the centre of the capital today. i'll step ahide and you can look for yourself and see what is going down there. tens of thousands have been converging on independence square, it's has a new name in recognise of protesters demands to bring ukraine back towards independence. it's opinion important protest. people want to see themselves as europeans. what is important is to get enough people out to make president viktor yanukovych understand this is what they want and to sit and listen to
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them. so the more people they can get the more likely they may be willing to net. if the numbers decline he'll have the upper hand. there's plenty to play for. they are used to this. they are willing to hold out longer yet. >> it is any man's guess whether this pressure will make a difference. is there reason to believe that it will? >> president viktor yanukovych does not have huge popularity ratings. he's gambling on his support base in the industrial heartland. there's a ukrainians that don't speak ukrainian. they rely on russia for their support. and for their trade and for energy. they get the natural gas from
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the russians. they fear that if they go towards europe, there's a lot of economic hardship ahead with structural reforms and that's why the country is split at the moment. >> okay. you will certainly keep us posted as demonstrations develop throughout the day. thank you robin. >> giving hope after losing a piece of oneself. one organization is give disabled people what they lost. >> the latest on the storm system across the u.s. we'll be hit by the know and ice. that is next. there, you can barely see it. that is the capital building in washington d.c. people are preparing for the storm system. more on the other side of the break. tñ
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>> welcome back to al jazeera america. just ahead a look at a facility in afghanistan looking to give people a chance at regaining
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independence. >> snow and rain - where it may fall. it's been a mess. eboni dean has the details. >> conditions will go downhill into the north-east where the cold air is in place. we have been watching the moisture whipping towards the north and east. around d.c. and baltimore we are expecting snow and then rain, especially as we move into monday. being blanketed by the snow. we'll see snow around chicago. it's coming down around indianapolis. it's adding to what is on the ground. >> travel plaps up and down the i-95 corridor. wintry precipitation. keep that in mind. especially further interior. >> thank you. india's ruling party appears set for a crushing defeat.
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early results show the opposition party ahead. they face growing anger over corruption, growth and high inflation. 30 people are dead, more than 50 injured after a series of bombings. the deadliest attack occurred in northern baghdad, killing nine and wounding four. recent acts of violence reached levels not seen in five years. around 1 billion people in the world see challenges in many areas of the society, including the workforce. it's providing a life line to the disabled. we have the details from kabul. >> few people understand the value of a prosthetic leg. when this man was three years old he played with something shiny. it exploded it took both
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his legs at the hip. >> he now works making prosthetic limbs for other afghans. >> i make prosthetic legs for other people. i'm proud of it. their life becomes easier. i'm happy with my work. >> he is part of an almost disabled workforce. it could be easy to see the atmosphere as being depressive. >> this is incredible. most here are disabled, proving to patient that they can live positive, functional lives. >> the centre provides physio therapy and treatments for thousands. some lost limbs. others are the victims of accident and genetic disease. >> in a country where able
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bodied struggled, staff struggled more. >> finding a job, if you are - you have less chance. it makes everything much more complicated. >> the government doesn't offer much help. this is a main hospital. it has 17 permanent beds for people paralyzed. in a cramped dirty space offering a roof over their heads but little treatment. back at the clinic, the facility may not be able to house every afghan that meets it, but their work is a life line. they have a strong spirit in spite of devastating industry. >> red -- more than 57,000
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patients have been registered at the centre. we look at live pictures the days of mourning in south africa at losing nelson mandela. today is the official day of mourning. earlier nelson mandela's former wife winnie mandela attended a church service. south africa begins a week of memorial events. look at the picture. a memorial ceremony will be held tuesday with president obama, george w. bush, jimmy carter and bill clinton attending. that will do it for that hour.
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